Information Theory

 

The field of Information Theory was born out of Claude Shannon’s landmark 1948 paper, A Mathematical Theory of Communication. Current activity in the field can be found at the IEEE Information Theory Society home page.

 

o   The IEEE Transactions on Information Theory is the main (western) journal devoted to information theory

o   Problems of Information Transmission is a translation of the Russian "Problemy Peredachi Informatsii"

o   A lot of information theory preprints are posted on the cs.IT section of the arXiv

o   Communications in Information and Systems publishes papers in information theory

o   A more recent journal (started in March 2003) is the International Journal of Quantum Information

o   Another journal started in 2003 is the Foundations and Trends in Communications and Information Theory

o   There is also an electronic journal devoted to Entropy and its relationship with various fields

o   And there's Information and Control and its continuation Information and Computation

o   An article on the fascinating connections between information theory and fundamental physics

o   What some people think about the second law of thermodynamics

 

Originally motivated by important problems in communications engineering, as a modern scientific field information theory has fundamental connections with various other fields. Shannon's remarkable 1948 discoveries immediately grasped the attention of the world mathematical community. One of the most prominent mathematicians of our century, A. N. Kolmogorov, generalized Shannon's ideas and placed them in the broader context of mathematics. These ideas had enormous and very broad impact. Today, information theory is seen as having fundamental connections with a very wide range of fields of mathematics, engineering and science, including, among many others, ergodic theory, statistics, probability theory, signal processing, dynamical systems, biology, high-dimensional convex geometry, coding theory, networks, and additive combinatorics.